Upcoming Executions
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Innocence
The death penalty puts innocent people at risk of execution.
Todd Willingham
Todd Willingham was wrongfully executed under Governor Rick Perry on February 17, 2004.

Click here to watch video of Anthony Graves accepting $3,000 in donations from TMN’s president Scott Cobb and then speaking with reporters and supporters on the TMN Facebook Page.

Texas Moratorium Network and friends delivered $3,000 in donations to Anthony Graves that were collected from TMN’s supporters and friends from across Texas, other U.S. states and other countries. Scott Cobb, president of TMN, and friends from Campaign to End the Death Penalty and Witness to Innocence delivered the donations to Anthony on Saturday, November 20.

According to KVUE:

Anthony Graves was grateful for his freedom and a $3,000 donation from anti-death penalty group the Texas Moratorium Network. The donation is to help him start a new life. The donations were collected from generous people throughout Texas, other U.S. states and other countries who had heard of Anthony’s story and wanted to help him after he was exonerated off Texas death row after 18 years of incarceration for a crime he did not commit.

“This is about humanity coming forward so I am very grateful for that,” Graves said. “It’s a bigger picture than the check that has been written, so I am very grateful for the show of humanity.”

The donation is a token, compared what Graves could receive from the State.
He was wrongfully convicted of the 1992 murders of a family of six in the Central Texas town of Sommerville.

Graves’ conviction was based solely on testimony from the real killer, Robert Earl Carter, who recanted before he was executed in 2000. Journalism students from The University of St. Thomas in Houston later conducted research that would lead to Graves’ freedom. The State could now give Graves 1.5M dollars for his ordeal.

“I was basically kidnapped by the criminal justice system and put on Texas Death Row,” Graves says.


Watch video on YouTube.

From KXAN:

 Dressed in a white sweater vest and black slacks, Anthony Graves , 45, received a $3,000 check from the president of the Texas Moratorium Network at a family member’s home in Pflugerville this afternoon to help him get assimilated back into society.
Graves spent the last 18 years, almost half of his life, sitting on death row for six murders he did not commit.
“Whatever you think hell is to you, that’s what it is,” said Graves of his time on death row.  “That was my experience. It’s just hell.”
In 1992, a grandmother, her daughter and four grandchildren were killed.  Their Somerville, Texas, home was set on fire to cover up the crime.
Robert Earl Carter, the father of one of the children killed, was convicted of capital murder and given the death penalty.
Carter told authorities he did not act alone and implicated Graves as his accomplice.   He later testified against Graves at trial.
Graves went to prison – he was 26 years old.  All the while, he maintained his innocence.
Prior to his execution in 2000, Carter recanted and said Graves had nothing to do with the murders.
An appeals court overturned Graves’ conviction in 2006, when they found prosecutors obtained false information from witnesses at trial.
“I experienced the dark side of our criminal justice system,” Graves explained.
Citing a lack of evidence, it took until last month for prosecutors to decide not to retry Graves. 

He was freed from prison.
Now, Graves told KXAN he is not bitter and wants to use his experience to fix what he calls a ‘broken’ criminal justice system.
“I just want to go out and make a difference. I want to be a part of a solution,” Graves explained.
Anthony is looking forward to spending Thanksgiving with his family – then tackling a world that he says has changed so much since he has been gone.
“I am having a hard time with technology just a cell phone. A cell phone just does so much now,” Graves said.
Graves also hope to return to school and obtain a degree in communications. 
He will put the $3,000 he received today towards clothing, medical care and other basic necessities.  Graves, however, is now be eligible to get more than a million dollars from the state because of his wrongful imprisonment. 

KVUE’s Jennie Huerta reported on our delivery of $3,000 in donations we collected from Texas Moratorium Network’s supporters and friends from across Texas, other U.S. states and other countries. Scott Cobb, president of TMN, and friends from Campaign to End the Death Penalty and Witness to Innocence delivered the donations to Anthony on Saturday, November 20. Watch the video on YouTube.

From KVUE:

Anthony Graves is grateful for his freedom and a donation from anti-death penalty group the Texas Moratorium Network.  The donation is to help him start a new life.   
“This is about humanity coming forward so I am very grateful for that,” Graves said.  “It’s a bigger picture than the check that has been written, so I am very grateful for the show of humanity.”
The donation is a token, compared what Graves could receive from the State.
He was wrongfully convicted of the 1992 murders of a family of six in the Central Texas town of Sommerville. 
Graves’ conviction was based solely on testimony from the real killer, Robert Earl Carter, who recanted before he was executed in 2000.  Journalism students from The University of St. Thomas in Houston later conducted research that would lead to Graves’ freedom.  The State could now give Graves 1.5M dollars for his ordeal.
“I was basically kidnapped by the criminal justice system and put on Texas Death Row,” Graves says.
Texas executes more inmates than any other state in the nation.  It is also the most generous state when it comes to compensating the wrongly convicted.  Last year the Texas Legislature increased the amount to 80,000 dollars for each year of wrongful imprisonment.  And just this month, the IRS ruled that it will no longer collect income tax on such compensation.
“I had an intense 18 years of living because of an injustice, so this one-point-four million is a small number, compared to what I’ve had to give up.” 
Graves says he won’t give up on getting justice for himself.  He is going back to court next week.  This time, it is to ask the judge to begin the legal process of getting what the State says he’s due.

As part of his compensation, the State could also give Graves a free, four-year college education.  He says he wants to study communication, and become an advocate for others like himself.

The Texas Attorney General has ordered Texas prison authorities to release information on the amount of drugs on hand to carry out executions. We now know that Texas’ total supply of one of the three drugs used to perform executions is set to expire in March 2011, so Texas will have to try to obtain more of that drug, unless it decides to use the expired batch, which would probably be challenged in court. 

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice just made public these new details about the three drugs used in executions:
Sodium Thiopental 118 1 gram vials 118 vials will expire March 2011
Purchase date July 2009
Pancuronium Bromide 185 10 milligram vials 60 vials will expire March 2012 / Purchase date March 2010 125 vials will expire December 2011 / Purchase date December 2010
Potassium Chloride 578 20 milliequivalent vials 125 vials will expire September 2011 / Purchase date March 2010 453 vials will expire July 2011 / Purchase date March 2010
At present, Texas has only one execution scheduled after March. Current executions are set in January, February and July.
Sodium Thiopental has been in short supply nationally since earlier this year when the sole U.S. manufacturer stopped making the drug, blaming a lack of ingredients. At least two states have since delayed or halted executions because they are out of Sodium Thiopental or because their supply has expired and cannot be used.
Until this afternoon, Texas prison officials had refused to disclose how much of the various drugs they had on hand and when their supplies expired.

More:

In a new decision, Attorney General Greg Abbott has ordered Texas prison officials to make public previously secret details about the drugs they use in lethal executions.
The five-page ruling dismisses the arguments by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice that the quantities, expiration dates and purchase information should be kept a state secret because it could disrupt the execution process in the state with the busiest death chamber.
The decision represented a victory for disclosure advocates, who had argued that prison officials were incorrect in insisting that making the details public might trigger violent protests outside the execution chamber in Huntsville or even embolden death penalty opponents, if they knew the state was about to run short of the drugs.
TDCJ could release the information, or file suit against the attorney general. If it releases the information, the documents could provide the first details in years about the three drugs Texas uses in executing criminals, information that used to be public but in recent years has been restricted.

Texas Moratorium Network will deliver $3,000 in donations to Anthony Graves on Saturday, November 20. The donations were collected from TMN’s supporters and friends who wanted to help Anthony after his recent exoneration from Texas Death Row. The donors include many people from across Texas, as well as people in other U.S. states and other countries.

It will probably be quite a while before Anthony Graves may receive compensation from the State of Texas for the 18 years he spent incarcerated in Texas for a crime he did not commit. Upon his release Anthony was given only a few hundred dollars. In a phone conversation when TMN informed him of the donations, Anthony said that these donations mean a lot to him because they come from the hearts of the people giving. He said the funds are greatly needed right now.

Next week will be Anthony’s first Thanksgiving celebration as a free man after being locked up for 18 years for a crime he did not commit. Many very generous people have already donated to help Anthony. We thank everyone who has donated so far and we can’t wait to deliver the funds to Anthony. You can also still donate. We will continue to send him donations that arrive after November 20.

If you would like to donate to help Anthony Graves, you can make a donation to TMN using a credit card by clicking here.




Or you can send a check to:
Texas Moratorium Network
3616 Far West Blvd, Suite 117, Box 251
Austin, Texas 78731
Please note on your check that your donation is for Anthony Graves. If you want to include a short note to Anthony, we will deliver your note along with the check we give him with all the donations. We want to give him the donations before Thanksgiving, but if we receive any donations for him after Thanksgiving, we will send him those donations too.
Donations to Texas Moratorium Network are not tax deductible because our primary mission is to advocate to the Texas Legislature to stop executions.
If you would like to make a tax deductible donation to help Anthony, you can make a donation to the 501 (c) (3) organization Texas Death Penalty Education and Resource Center.

On October 27, Anthony Graves became the 12th person exonerated after being wrongfully convicted and sent to Texas death row. Anthony is a completely innocent man who spent a total of 18 years locked up for a crime he had absolutely nothing to do with. Twelve of those years were spent on Texas death row in a tiny cell having his food shoved through a small slit in the door. The other years were spent in jail awaiting retrial and facing the prospect of again being sentenced to death. Anthony is now back in the loving embrace of his family and friends and soon he will enjoy his first Thanksgiving holiday as a free man in 18 years.


Texas Moratorium Network would like to help Anthony transition to his new life. We have spoken to one of his attorneys and she expects a legal fight before Anthony claims any compensation from Texas for his years of wrongful conviction. In fact, it will likely take quite a while before he receives any money from the State. Upon his release on October 27, he was only given a few hundred dollars.
We asked his lawyer how we could help. She told us that he is in need of the basics of life, including new clothes, pocket money, and all the other normal things that a person would need whose nightmarish false conviction at the hands of the state has just ended. He needs to get on with his life and with your help we can give him a little help making the adjustment to freedom.
In 2004, after Ernest Willis was exonerated and released from Texas death row, Texas Moratorium Network asked our supporters to help Ernest. We were able to raise $1,000 in a short time and send it to Ernest in 2004. We received the below message from Ernest Willis after he received our check for $1,000 in 2004.
“Hello, I do appreciate the donations & your time & help in getting the donations. Yes, the state of Texas gave me $100.00 when I was released & that was all. I am doing okay since my release & am very happy to be free. I have not had any problems adjusting to the life out here.
Again -I do appreciate the help, it is greatly appreciated as I do need it”.
Thank You,
Ernest Willis
Now, it is time to help another innocent person just released from Texas Death Row.


If you are unable to afford a donation to Anthony right now, please keep him and his family in your thoughts, especially when you gather your family around the table on Thanksgiving Day.
Thank you,

Your friends at Texas Moratorium Network

Below is a photo of a typical cell on Texas death row. Anthony Graves lived in such a cell even though he was an innocent person.


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